> MoMA PS1 Roof Deck

Besler & Sons
Photograph of an architectural site model of MoMA PS1 Roof Deck proposal

Site model. (photograph by Ryan Conroy and Walker Olesen)

  1. An invited competition proposal for the Museum of Modern Art’s (MoMA) PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP), led by Erin Besler, with Besler & Sons team members Jamie Barron, Kyle Branchesi, Ryan Conroy, Chris Gassaway, Devin Koba, Ingrid Lao, Bernhard Luthringshausen, Tori McKenna, Dami Olufowoshe, Tom Pompeani, Sai Rojanapirom, Shane Reiner-Roth, Evi Temmel, and Tessa Watson.
  2. Amerimax Model Showroom was exhibited between and as part of the 2015 Architectural League Prize installation at Parsons The New School for Design in the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center in New York City.
  3. Roof Deck was presented in as part of the Design Critique + Drink series at The Frog art space in Los Angeles.
  4. Amerimax Motel Showroom was exhibited in as part of A One-Night Stand for Art & Architecture, an installation at the Holiday Lodge Motel in Los Angeles.
  5. The roof occupies a fundamental position in architecture, creating inhabitable space both below and above. This is underscored by block party vernacular; we commonly hear admonitions to “raise the roof” or “tear the roof off,” and, even more hyperbolically, that the “roof is on fire.” Through these expressions, revelry is compounded with acts of architectural revision.

  6. Roof Deck repositions MoMA PS1’s existing roof and refits it into the courtyard, where it is activated as a social space across a spectrum of programs and experiences — from celebrity yoga to ecstatic celebration, from the collection of construction materials to exhibition through social media. Along with the summertime impulse to flaunt and reveal comes the struggle to be fit and get in shape. Paralleling this, the roof is made fit and is also the site of performance and physical fitness programming on the roof deck.

  7. The construction of the roof and deck exploit the tendency to accumulate waste that building practices typically produce. Rather than discard material remnants off-site, excess is cut and refit into the project for use. The roof’s gutter system redirects water that would otherwise go to waste into a collection and retention system, turning an otherwise mundane aspect of exterior architectural drainage into a feature that provides water fit for use. Borrowing from the language of the architectural building site, the always in-progress roof is made more fit as uses change and tempos shift.

    Water circulation. (photographs by Ryan Conroy and Walker Olesen)
    Making Fit website mockups.

    Plan research. All 75 plans for installations or proposed installations for the Young Architects Program in the MoMA PS1 courtyard (-).